William Golden, born about 1750

Table of Contents

A Probable History of the Golden Family
of Newberry, South Carolina Since 1761

Updated 2022.12.31

Golden Genealogy and Family History

 

William Golden, born about 1750, place unknown. Believed to have died in late 1809, probably at Newberry, South Carolina.

There are no documents that at any point discuss William’s specific age at any time. Census records placed people within year brackets. The ability to sign a contract or to conduct legal transactions was age 21+.

Age 21 / Legal Transactions: 1774, we know that William Golden had his own property adjacent to Thomas Golden. This would indicate that he was born in 1753 or before, if age 21 in 1774.

  • Parents: Thomas Golden presumed to be father. Mother may have been a Noel.
  • Spouse: Name unknown. May have been Nelly or Nellie Golden. William’s younger children were living in household of Nellie Golden during 1810 census, same place as where William lived. A nearby family, the Warrens, claim Eleanor Golden as their mother, married to William Warren. Nelly/Nellie is a common nickname for Eleanor. Could Nelly in 1810 have been William Golden‘s sister instead of wife, taking care of his children. We do not know. The 1810 census is the only time she is mentioned in any record.
  • Children:

~~~ Possible children pre-Revolutionary War service. Some or all could also be children of William’s father Thomas. Samuel Golden and Thomas W. Golden male descendants are yDNA-tested and are our Golden family one way or another.

~~~~~~ Samuel Golden, born about 1770 South Carolina

~~~~~~ John Golden (Unconfirmed), born about 1775 South Carolina

~~~~~~ Thomas W. Golden, born about 1775 South Carolina

~~~Post-Revolutionary War children. 1790, 1800 and 1810 census does not provide names but there is room for little doubt that these Goldens are referenced in census reports. Other confirmatory information will be discussed in the profile for each. All male lines are yDNA-tested.

~~~~~~ Nathaniel Greene Golden, born about 1783 South Carolina

~~~~~~ Isaac Golden, born about 1784 South Carolina

~~~~~~ Margaret Frances Golden, born about 1785 South Carolina

~~~~~~ FNU Daughter, born 1786-1789 South Carolina

~~~~~~ Abraham Golden, born 1790 South Carolina

~~~~~~ FNU Daughter, born 1792-1795 South Carolina

~~~~~~ Sarah Frances Golden, born 1796 South Carolina

  • Military: Served in Dutch Fork Royalist Militia Regiment under command of Major Daniel Clary, family kin by the c1810 marriage of the Nathaniel Greene Golden (c1783) line into the Morgan family of Rachel Isabella Morgan (c1784). [1]Daniel Clary, c1706 MD – aft.1795 Newberry, SC, is kin by being husband of 1st cousin 7x removed, Eleanor Deveron, 1715-1761, grandmother to our Loftin line of Newberry SC grandparents: Thomas … Continue reading Pay records indicate loyalist service from 1777-1780. [2]’Dutch Fork‘ is the regional name for the greater Newberry area. ‘Dutch’ comes from ‘Deutsch’ which means German. The Dutch Fork today is comprised of the counties … Continue reading After the 1780 Fall of Charleston, William served in the revolutionary regiment of Colonel Philemon Waters, a Newberry area plantation owner on the Saluda River. [3]William Goulding received payment in amount of indent (payment for pledged service after service fulfilled): 6.8.6 3/4 £ English pounds currency for his service during Anderson’s Return, in … Continue reading [4]Can we seek DAR recognition for William Golden’s service? No. We must establish firm confirmation of descent. Our William died c1809 and did not live long enough to go through the process of … Continue readingAfter the Battle of Eutaw Springs (Sep 1781), Colonel Waters erected a defensive block house at his plantation at Waters Ferry, Saluda, SC. He then became an active recruiter of loyalists to switch sides without forcing them to serve. Waters also had a reputation of defending loyalists who had done no more than serve honorably in loyalist militia. [5]Treatment of captured loyalists, one story in particular emphasizes Water’s stance: … He [Waters] captured a man (a Tory) peculiarly obnoxious to Colonel Brandon [Water’s … Continue reading  William Goulding is listed on a final payroll settlement document of 2 Apr 1786 for militia duty since the Fall of Charleston (May 1780). [6]How do we know that this was our grandfather William Golden? We will never be able to confirm this. The militia of both sides kept only pay records that identified the unit that a member belonged to … Continue reading View this link for a much larger discussion of Revolutionary War service by William.
  • Working Notes: Yes, but not yet organized online.
  • A Last Will and Testament and/or Probate documentation exists: No. None believed to exist, even if one was created in the past. [7]Years refer to the county record books. There are wills for William Golden (1840-1858, probably a Golding) and a variety of Goldings: Polly Golding (1840-1858); Reuben Golding (1823-1840); Robert … Continue reading

TIMELINE 

1760: 

~~~ 1767 Oct 7: … Thomas Perry (Parry) receives land grant for 100 acres that sits on the northern boundary of the 200 acres granted to our Thomas Golden. Kinship of Thomas Perry to our grandfather William Nathan Perry (c1748) has not been confirmed. [8]Like many genealogies for the period, there were few records naming relationships. We do not know the parentage of our grandfather William Nathan Perry, which could have been Thomas Perry. … Continue reading

1770:

~~~ 1774 Oct 18: … Edward Cox receives land grant of 67 acres by Hon. William Ball 18 October 1774 lying on Beaver Dam Creek from Thomas Golden’s Spring Branch binding on Joel Etheridge’s land and William Golden. Joel was a distance cousin to William from a Virginia line related to the Noel family, Noels being William Golden’s grandmother line from father Thomas. [9]Relationship of Joel Etheridge and William Golden: 5th cousin 1x removed. Source of this land transaction

~~~ 1777-1780: … Served in Dutch Fork Royalist Militia Regiment under command of Major Daniel Clary, serving within the company of second cousin commanded by Vachel Clary.[10]Post war relationship: Vachel Clary is 2nd cousin 1x removed of daughter-in-law (Rachel Isabella Morgan married to William’s son Nathaniel Greene Golden) of William Golden. Pay records indicate service from 1777-1780. ‘Dutch Fork‘ is the greater Newberry area and today is comprised of the counties of Lexington, Newberry, and Richland. After the 1780 Fall of Charleston, William served in the rebel regiment of Colonel Philemon Waters, a neighbor to our Goldens. Colonel Waters was an active recruiter of loyalists to switch sides without forcing them to serve: William Goulding is listed on a final payroll settlement document of 2 Apr 1786 for militia duty since the Fall of Charleston (May 1780). View this link for a much larger discussion of Revolutionary War service by William.

1780:

~~~ 1780 – 14 Jun through 13 Dec 1780William Golden is #31 on Pay Abstract Nr 1, for Colonel Daniel Clary‘s Regiment (Royalist), Dutch Fork Militia, Ninety Six Brigade. He serves with rank of Private in Captain Vachel Clary‘s Company of men who went to Orangeburgh with Lieutenant Colonel John H. Cruger. Due 183 days of pay for service between 14 Jun-13 Dec 1780. Also serving in the unit was Reuben Morgan (#11 on Pay Abstract; may have been Reuben Clinton Morgan Sr, 1755-1829; uncle to Rachel Isabella Morgan, wife of Nathaniel Greene Golden, c1783-aft.1822). [11]Source: Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Vol I, Murtie June Clark, 1981, pg 229.

~~~ 1780 Aug 19: Battle of Musgrove Mill. The loyalist troops responsible for securing Musgrove Mill was assigned to Colonel Daniel Clary, Dutch Fork Militia Regiment, under charge of  a Major Fraser. Revolutionary troops were able to overcome the defense prepared by the Dutch Fork troops, a number being killed and captured. [12]Colonial and Revolutionary History of Upper South Carolina, by John Belton O’Neall Landrum, Jan 1897 · Shannon, printers. Pages 178-179. … Pay records show that William Golden served through 13 December 1780, four months beyond the Battle of Musgrove Mill, so obviously he was not among those captured. William may also have not been at Musgrove Mill. Clary’s troops under Colonel John H. Cruger were at this moment responsible for the defense of the garrison of Ninety Six.  [13]Pay records for Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Vol I, Murtie June Clark, 1981, pg 229.

~~~ 1785: … An Indenture of Lease and Release from Frederick Gray to John Howell was proved by the oaths of Adam Taylor & William Golden witnesses thereto and ordered o be recorded. [14]Newberry County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1798, by the Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr, 1977, Southern Historical Press, Easley, South Carolina /B/

~~~ 1786 Jul 18-19: … Witness to a probable neighbor’s land transaction. Frederick Gray of Ninety Six District, planter to John Howell of same, planter, for £20 sterling, 160 acres granted to Frederik Gray in Newberry County adj. William Elmore, recorded in Book DDD, page 313. Frederick Gray (Seal), Wit: Adam Daylor (A), William Golden (mark), William Howell (X). Proved in open Court 4, Sept 1786. [15]Relationship to any of these individuals is unknown. A John Howell lived in Liberty County, Georgia and William Elmore lived in Lincoln County, North Carolina, several counties north of Newberry on … Continue reading

~~~

1790: 

~~~ 1792: Supposedly William Golden bought property within Edgefield District, South Carolina. Can find no record of this.

1800: 

~~~ 1800 Census: William Goulden is head of household with 1 male under age 10, 1 male 10-15, 1 male 45+ (self), and 2 females under age 10, 1 female 10-15, 1 female 16-25 and a female 45+. Total in household: 8.  The location is given only as Edgefield, South Carolina; referring to anywhere within Edgefield District which included several modern counties. There is no reason to be believe that William is not still living on Beaverdam Creek, Newberry in the section known today as Helena. [16]Year: 1800; Census Place: Edgefield, South Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 47; Page: 177; Image: 343; Family History Library Film: 181422

~~~ 1804 Dec 15: … Thomas Golden, probable son or brother of William Golden: … Thomas Golden and John Pike are witnesses to Daniel Cotney deeding 200 acres for $300 to William Cotney. Land is located on the waters of Little Saluda River on Beaverdam Creek. This land is part of an original 762 acres granted to Kisiah Cotney on 19 Feb 1791, subsequently conveyed to Daniel Cotney on 23 Mar 1798. [17]Edgefield County, South Carolina Deed Books 30 and 31, abstracted by Carols Wells, pg 212. Heritage Books, Inc. Note: Margaret Frances Golden, daughter of William Golden, married William Jackson Cotney. She would sign away all dower rights to this property on 15 May 1806. [18]Justice John Pope certifies relinquishment of dowery rights by Margaret Frances Golden, who signed her name with an ‘X’.  Edgefield County, South Carolina Deed Books 30 and 31, … Continue reading

~~~ 1805 Feb 25: … Beaver Dam Creek, Saluda, SC … Sarah Edwards to Benjamin Forkner, Deed, $100, sixty seven acres lying on from Thomas Goldens Spring Branch binding on Joel Etheridges land and William Golden. Wit William Calney [Cotney], Thomas Harris. /s/ Sarah (x) Edwards[19]25 Feb 1805: Cotney kin William Jackson Cotney (1773–1819), married to William Golden‘s daughter Margaret Frances Golden (1784–1875), is a land transaction witness.  Edgefield County, … Continue reading

1810:

~~~

++++++++++

©2022 William Golden, Norfolk1956@gmail.com // Material may be shared without requesting permission and with appropriate attribution: A Probable History of the Golden Family of Newberry, South Carolina Since 1761, compiled by William Golden ©2022

References

References
1 Daniel Clary, c1706 MD – aft.1795 Newberry, SC, is kin by being husband of 1st cousin 7x removed, Eleanor Deveron, 1715-1761, grandmother to our Loftin line of Newberry SC grandparents: Thomas Morgan, 1725–1792, and Catherine Isabell Chitta Loftin, 1722–1801, and Benjamin Francis (Franklin) Morgan Sr, 1762–1835, and Sarah Francis Perry, 1767–1845. Wife of Daniel Clary Col / Loyalist and to our our Newberry grandparents. How close were we during the Revolutionary War? Very close. The 100 acres of the Perry family directly abutted the northern boundary of our Thomas Golden‘s 200 acres. See 1767 timeline below for map. 
2 Dutch Fork‘ is the regional name for the greater Newberry area. ‘Dutch’ comes from ‘Deutsch’ which means German. The Dutch Fork today is comprised of the counties of Lexington, Newberry, and Richland.
3 William Goulding received payment in amount of indent (payment for pledged service after service fulfilled): 6.8.6 3/4 £ English pounds currency for his service during Anderson’s Return, in Water’s Regiment, Ninety Six District after the fall of Charleston. He is registered as Entry 2534, Book X. Source: Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution, Vol I, A-J, by Bobby Gilmer Moss, 2009, pg 59.
4 Can we seek DAR recognition for William Golden’s service? No. We must establish firm confirmation of descent. Our William died c1809 and did not live long enough to go through the process of formal recognition.>> The process is that often only officers had any proof of service (they received a letter of commission and payment to acquire uniforms and various things they would need). For regular soldiers and militia, documentation of service was a simple muster roster (showed up for duty!) record kept by an officer.When a soldier fullfilled their period of service then the pay record was sent for payment. After the war in the 1820s was the first that Revolutionary War service was rewarded — and it was difficult to get recognition. Soldiers would have to collect of service from fellow unit members and have those letters sworn into court statements.Our William and his wife, whether Nellie Golden or other, had passed away a decade before the process for recognizing Revolutinary War service was put into place.
5 Treatment of captured loyalists, one story in particular emphasizes Water’s stance: … He [Waters] captured a man (a Tory) peculiarly obnoxious to Colonel Brandon [Water’s commander]. After this skirmish when the prisoners were presented to the Colonel, he on seeing Waters’ prisoner, drew his sword, and was in the act of rushing upon him to slay him. Waters threw himself between them, and announced to his superior that the prisoner was under his protection, and “should not be harmed.” The purpose of vengeance was not abandoned, and Capt. Waters was peremptorily ordered to stand out of the way. “Africa” said he to his servant. “bring me my rifle; no sooner said than done. With his rifle in his hand, and an eye that never quailed, he said to the colonel, “Now strike the prisoner – the instant you do, I will shoot you dead.” The blow was not struck; the prisoner was saved. Source: Col. Philemon Waters – Patriot and Adventurer, https://www.familytreecircles.com/col-philemon-waters-patriot-and-adventurer-31170.html
6 How do we know that this was our grandfather William Golden? We will never be able to confirm this. The militia of both sides kept only pay records that identified the unit that a member belonged to and their time of service. The only other inhabitant of the area with a similar name was the elderly William Golding, c1705-1782, that lived nearby in Abbeville. He and his son Anthony Foster Golding, 1746-1801, are recognized by the DAR for their service — driving a wagon to deliver food and stuff to the militia. Neither served nor claimed to serve in the militia. Anthony Foster Golding had a son William, born just as the Revolution (1767) was starting.
7 Years refer to the county record books. There are wills for William Golden (1840-1858, probably a Golding) and a variety of Goldings: Polly Golding (1840-1858); Reuben Golding (1823-1840); Robert Golding (1805-1826); and Robert Golding (1823-1840) … This is reprint of an earlier indexing of wills in 1939 for Abbeville Co., 1787-1855 — Anderson Co., 1791-1857 — Barnwell Co., 1787-1856 — Chester Co., 1789-1853 — Darlington Co., 1785-1853 — Edgefield Co., 1785-1853 — Fairfield Co., 1787-1857 — Greenville co., 1787-1853 — Horry Co., 1799-1853 — Kershaw Co., 1770-1853 — Laurens Co., 1766-1853 — Marion Co., 1796-1855 — Marlboro Co., 1787-1853 — Newberry Co., 1776-1858 — Pickens Co., 1828-1862 — Richland Co., 1787-1864 — Spartanburg Co., 1787-1858 — Sumter Co., 1774-1853 — Union Co., 1777-1849 — Williamsburg Co., 1802-1853 — York Co., 1770-1853 … Source: Indexes to the county wills of South Carolina, by University of South Carolina. Library Publication date 1970,Publisher Baltimore, Genealogical Pub. Co.
8 Like many genealogies for the period, there were few records naming relationships. We do not know the parentage of our grandfather William Nathan Perry, which could have been Thomas Perry. William’s daughter and our grandmother Sarah Francis Perry (1767–1845) married Benjamin Francis (Franklin) Morgan Sr (1762–1835), an ancestor line for the Nathaniel Greene Golden (c1783) branch of our family.
9 Relationship of Joel Etheridge and William Golden: 5th cousin 1x removed. Source of this land transaction
10 Post war relationship: Vachel Clary is 2nd cousin 1x removed of daughter-in-law (Rachel Isabella Morgan married to William’s son Nathaniel Greene Golden) of William Golden.
11 Source: Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Vol I, Murtie June Clark, 1981, pg 229.
12 Colonial and Revolutionary History of Upper South Carolina, by John Belton O’Neall Landrum, Jan 1897 · Shannon, printers. Pages 178-179. …
13 Pay records for Loyalists in the Southern Campaign, Vol I, Murtie June Clark, 1981, pg 229.
14 Newberry County, South Carolina, Minutes of the County Court, 1785-1798, by the Rev. Silas Emmett Lucas, Jr, 1977, Southern Historical Press, Easley, South Carolina /B/
15 Relationship to any of these individuals is unknown. A John Howell lived in Liberty County, Georgia and William Elmore lived in Lincoln County, North Carolina, several counties north of Newberry on the other side of Kings Mountain. Whether these are the same individuals referenced is unknown.
16 Year: 1800; Census Place: Edgefield, South Carolina; Series: M32; Roll: 47; Page: 177; Image: 343; Family History Library Film: 181422
17 Edgefield County, South Carolina Deed Books 30 and 31, abstracted by Carols Wells, pg 212. Heritage Books, Inc.
18 Justice John Pope certifies relinquishment of dowery rights by Margaret Frances Golden, who signed her name with an ‘X’.  Edgefield County, South Carolina Deed Books 30 and 31, abstracted by Carols Wells, pg 212. Heritage Books, Inc.
19 25 Feb 1805: Cotney kin William Jackson Cotney (1773–1819), married to William Golden‘s daughter Margaret Frances Golden (1784–1875), is a land transaction witness.  Edgefield County, South Carolina: Deed Book 73, abstracted by Carol Wells.
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