Thomas Gouldman, c1640-1684

Gouldman and four influencing Virginia rivers of James, York Rappahannock and PotomacA General History of the Thomas Gouldman Family
of Old Rappahannock County, Virginia

Updated 2023.01.15
Table of Contents

 

There are no documentary clues as to the geographic origin of Thomas Gouldman, aka Goldman. Names given to children indicate a United Kingdom (UK) origin.

There are no documentary clues as to the parentage of Thomas Gouldman, although there are some naming recurrences and recurring combinations across the centuries: Edward, Francis and Thomas. Francis is a rarely used name for men — yet it has existed for almost 400 years in constant use within the Gouldman family and some Goldman families.

PROFILE

  • ParentsUnknown. Various sets of parents appear in genealogies — View those
  • DNA Tested? Yes, but insufficient number of male participants for a confirmatory male yDNA haplotype identification. A single male Gouldman is known to have taken a yDNA test (2022), with haplotype I-M253, possibly I-FGC73050 [1]Test participant descends from Richard Henry Gouldman, 1804/1811-1874, whose parents are unconfirmed. Born and passed in King & Queen, Virginia. Married to Sarah (Sally) Schools, 1812-between … Continue reading … There are female Gouldman descendants that are atDNA tested (Ancestry, 23andMe, etc.). I have access to the atDNA/yDNA test results for the male I-M253 Gouldman and for atDNA for three female Gouldmans.
  • Birth: c1640, place unknown, probably UK or possibly Massachusetts.
  • Death: 1684, probably at home at his ‘Goldborough’ homestead, aka ‘Goldboro’, Old Rappahanock County, Virginia.
  • Spouse:
    ~~~ Yes, Alice Awbrey (Awbry, Aubrey).
  • Children:
    ~~~ Yes.

~~~~~~ Edward Gouldman
~~~~~~ Francis Gouldman
~~~~~~ Robert Gouldman
~~~~~~ Thomas Gouldman 

  • Military: Bacon’s Rebellion, served as a Private in rebelling militia. Probably served in local regional militia before 1670 under leadership of Colonel John Catlett as militia duty was mandatory. Was referred to as ‘Captain Gouldman‘ in 1679.
  • Working Notes: Yes, but not yet organized online.

TIMELINE

— Will migrate events and footnotes from https://www.wikitree.com/wiki/Gouldman-23 … many more notes exist offline.

1630:

— No presence of a Thomas Goldman or Gouldman in any known records for North America. Within England, there was a Thomas Gouldman born before 1600, passing away in 1629 at Mersham, Kent, England, married to an Ellen (born c1605) with three sons named in his last will and testament: George, John, and Thomas Gouldman. [2]Source: Original Last Will and Testament (LWT) on file at Mersham, England (PDF copy in my records) in Wills and Probate records for 1629. Family name was spelled Gouldmyun in the LWT; spelling was … Continue reading If mother Ellen was born in 1605 then sons probably born after 1620.

As of 2022, I have not found records as to what happened to the sons— have not had time to research them since finding these English records in 2021.

1640:

~~~ 1640: Probably born between 1640 but no later than 1644. Later land legal transactions could only be conducted by someone age 21 or more. Thomas Gouldman appears in 1666 Virginia land grant record; original still exists in Virginia Archives. No presence of a Thomas Goldman or Gouldman in any known records for North America during 1640s or 1650s.

~~~ 1642: Scenario #1: Francis Gouldman (Goldman or Gelding) arrives in Virginia as an ‘import’ and probable indenture to Francis Yeardley. [3]See 1642 in Arriving in America – 1607 to 1699 for more details:  https://goldengenealogy.com/arriving-in-america-who-when-where A Francis Gouldman (born c1607) of Essex, England had a son Thomas Gouldman that was born 21 Mar 1640 at South Ockendon, St Nicholas, Essex, England. If this scenario were plausible then Thomas Gouldman could have arrived in Virginia a baby and would reach adulthood and have the legal right to conduct business as of 1662. There are two issues  with this scenario: a Francis Gouldman of South Ockendon, St Nicholas, Essex, England died there with probate on 12 May 1690. Francis Gouldman also had a second son, Francis Jr, that was born at South Ockendon in 1642; there is a baptismal record with month and date illegible. [4]Francis Gouldman – c1607-1688 or 1690 – LWT Probate 1690 … on rightsided page beginning with Probatum … Source: England & Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, … Continue reading However, the Gouldmans were of some wealth and it was not at all uncommon for Virginians to return to England to live there once again. Francis Gouldman could well have returned — we know almost nothing of his life in South Ockendon, England between 1642-1690. As for any indenture, it appears that indenture records, which were legal contracts, do not exist before 1654. [5]Virtual Jamestown researchers have only been able to find records starting in 1654 — see http://www.virtualjamestown.org/indentures/about_indentures.html

~~~ 1642: Scenario #2: Francis Gouldman (Goldman or Gelding) arrives in Virginia as an ‘import’ and probable indenture to Francis Yeardley. He does not bring his family and his ‘importation’ is part of a quasi-scam land deal in which imports sometimes occured for the purpose of creating numbers to acquire land (it was 50 acres per head imported, for those age 16+). In my research for the Keeling family of Princess Anne, Virginia, Thomas Keeling arrived in 1628 as an indenture and returned to England in 1634 to marry, returning in 1635. Four years later during 1634, Keeling bought land and had timber cut for his new home to be built upon his return. Keeling’s indenture was the ‘lite’ version.

1650:

— No presence of a Thomas Goldman or Gouldman in any known records for North America during 1650s.

1660:

1664: Thomas Gouldman of Rappahannock, Virginia recorded as a witness at a court proceeding — although can find no record for this claim, previously made (but now deleted) from the well footnoted website ‘Early Colonial Settlers of Southern Maryland and Virginia’s Northern Neck Counties: [6]https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I34315&tree=Tree1

———- 2022 Update: Thomas Gouldman is no longer the first Goldman or Gouldman present in the colonies prior to 1664. A Francis Goldman is documented as ‘transported’ to Virginia by Captain Francis Yeardly in 1642… and settled at Northhampton County, Virginia.  A 1642 arrival year probably indicates a birth before 1626 (age 16), if not 1621 (age 21, adulthood) or before [7]There was a Francis Gouldman baptised 14 Sep 1606 at St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Norfolk, England, born to Elizabeth Aldrich (Aldriche, Allred), age 22, and Richard aka Nicholas Goodwin / Gouldman, … Continue reading … Although a Francis transported a Francis to Virginia, ‘Francis’ is a rare name. Francis continues in use among Virginia Gouldmans some 380 years later. [8]Virginia Land Records [database on-line Ancestry] … Excerpted and reprinted from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine and … Continue reading

1666 Oct 26th: Receives land grant for 1134 acres on Ralph’s Creek for transportation of 27 persons. Math: Received 216 acres fewer than expected. 50 acres were usually granted per person imported into Virginia as a settler. 27 x 50 = 1350 acres. There are 216 acres missing.

1667 Apr 4th: Receives land grant for 1200 acres on the south side of the Rappahannock River, “some five miles in the woods, adjoining Lodskins Creek, for the transportation of 24 persons”. Math: Sums correctly. 50 acres were usually granted per person imported into Virginia as a settler: 24 x 50 = 1200 acres.

1668/69 Feb 3rd: “Know &c all men by these presents that I Ralph Warrener, of the age of sixteen years but under the age of one and twenty, son of Ralph Warrener of the county of Rappa. deceased hereby elect and choose Thomas Gouldman of the aforesaid county, now resident upon my father’s plantation my curator or guardian;” … the 21 day of ____ (unreadable) … Signed Ralph Warrener. Recd Feb 3, 1669 [9]~~~ The Warriner Family of New England Origin, Being a History and Genealogy of William Warriner, Pioneer Settler of Springfield, Mass., and His Descendants Embracing Nine Generations from 1638 to … Continue reading

1670:

1673 Mar 7: Following is an abstract of the will of Ralph Warrener the younger, recorded in the books of Old Rappahannock [now Essex] county, Va.: “I Ralph Warrener, sick in body, but in perfect mind and memory, Desire to be buried at home near my father and mother. To Francis Freger my cow, squired at Col. Vassell‘s old plantation. My horse to Col. Dyer. All my tobacco to my guardian Thos. Gouldman he to lay out the same for my sister’s particular use. To my sister three young black cows, a steer, one bull & two sows.” … Dated March 7, 1673-4. Proved in Rappahannock May 31, 1674. [10]~~~ The Warriner Family of New England Origin, Being a History and Genealogy of William Warriner, Pioneer Settler of Springfield, Mass., and His Descendants Embracing Nine Generations from 1638 to … Continue reading

1674 Sep 23rd: 2250 acres on Hastings Creek, adjoining a former patent, for the transportation of 44 persons. Math: Almost sums correctly. 50 acres were usually granted per person imported into Virginia as a settler: 44 x 50 = 2200 acres. Received 50 more acres than math indicates due.

1676: Edward Keeling (born before 1656) inherited land in 1676 with Thomas Gouldman (c1640-1684) from Ralph Warriner. The land was split almost in half, each getting the land opposite the river bank of the other’s newly inherited land on Mill Creek, Old Rappahannock County, Virginia.

1676 March 13th: A letter of ‘grevances of ye County of Rappahannock’ is published with 15 questions and considerations desired for the governor to address. Signed: “God save the Kinge”, signed by Warwick Cammack, Allex Donyphann, Henry Tandey, Hen. Awley (? Henry Awbrey), Thomas Gouldman [11]Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. … Continue reading

1679: Referred to as ‘Captain Gouldman‘ for first time. Captain Gouldman was a justice of the peace in Rappahannock County. [12]Rappahannock County Records, 1683-86, page 156.

1680:

1680 June 9th: Capt Thomas Gouldman sworn in as a Burgess by Col Thomas Ballard, Speaker, House of Burgesses. [13]Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. … Continue reading

1680 June 10th: Capt Thomas Gouldman appointed as member of the ‘Committee appointed for Examination of public debts and claims’, House of Burgesses. [14]Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. … Continue reading

1680-1682: Thomas Gouldman “represented this county in the House of Burgesses 1680-1682”:  (Old) Rappahannock County. From the Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses, there are references to several committees that Captain Thomas Gouldman served upon. His two years in the House of Burgesses were quiet and uneventful. 1682, served on a committee to determine how much tobacco each county must send to pay for the garrisoning of troops, and his name appeared in House minutes as Goldman just as often as use of the name Gouldman when referring to Thomas Gouldman. [15]Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. … Continue reading

Thomas Gouldman Burgess for the Assembly
Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia. 1659/60–1693]. Richmond, Virginia: MCMXIV (1914)

— 1680 Nov 3rd: William Pearce appoints “my well beloved Friend, Capt. Thomas Gouldman attorney to acknowledge the above deed. 3 Nov 1680. Willi. Peirce. Test: Wm Birdall, Will Peirce, Junr. [This concerns the 4054 acre patent of Col. Wm Peirce of Westmoreland that was in Rappahannock Co.] [16]Early Pierces in the Rappahannock Valley: an annotated chronology. http://www.piercevaubel.com/pierce/6francispierce.htm

1684: When Thomas Gouldman passed away, Edward Keeling intervened and posted bond to secure Thomas’ widow Alice North Gouldman against a debt owed to Robert Synock.

1687: June 1687, Edward Keeling is dying. He writes his will naming Edward Gouldman (1660-1710) as his godson. Edward is son of Thomas Gouldman. Edward Keeling bequeaths Edward Gouldman a cow named ‘Pretty’ and all of Pretty’s increase (calves, and their calves once they can reproduce) are to be used for Edward Gouldman’s education.

~~~~~~ Until 2019, I believed that Edward Keeling was probably related to the Keelings of Princess Anne, Virginia. I found Keeling males from the Princess Anne (now Virginia Beach) Keeling line and yDNA tested them: we are not compatible. They are yDNA haplogroup J-M267 (J-BY56688). Our Goldens are R-U106 DF98+.

~~~~~~ Was Edward Keeling related to the Princess Anne Keelings? I do not know. Edward’s history before becoming a close associate of Thomas Gouldman is unknown. They could be family and we just do not yet know how.

~~~~~~ Some genealogies claim that Old Rappahannock’s Edward Keeling was a son of Thomas Keeling of Princess Anne. Not so. Thomas’ widow gave a deposition in which she noted that her son Edward had passed away some years ago (as of 1662?) [17]Footnote needed  … Have collected ‘arrivals’ of other Keelings. One was a George Keeling who arrived in Maryland in 1635. That arrival would be just across the waterway, the Potomac River, … Continue reading

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©2023 William Golden, Norfolk1956@gmail.com // Material may be shared without requesting permission and with appropriate attribution: A General History of the Thomas Gouldman Family of Old Rappahannock County, Virginia, compiled by William Golden

References

References
1 Test participant descends from Richard Henry Gouldman, 1804/1811-1874, whose parents are unconfirmed. Born and passed in King & Queen, Virginia. Married to Sarah (Sally) Schools, 1812-between 1893-1896 at King and Queen County, Virginia.
2 Source: Original Last Will and Testament (LWT) on file at Mersham, England (PDF copy in my records) in Wills and Probate records for 1629. Family name was spelled Gouldmyun in the LWT; spelling was irregular and fonetik in records during this time period.
3 See 1642 in Arriving in America – 1607 to 1699 for more details:  https://goldengenealogy.com/arriving-in-america-who-when-where
4 Francis Gouldman – c1607-1688 or 1690 – LWT Probate 1690 … on rightsided page beginning with Probatum … Source: England & Wales, Prerogative Court of Canterbury Wills, 1384-1858 for Francisci Gouldman,  PROB 11: Will Registers, 1688-1696, Piece 399: Dyke, Quire Numbers 45-90 (1690) … copy of original in my records.
5 Virtual Jamestown researchers have only been able to find records starting in 1654 — see http://www.virtualjamestown.org/indentures/about_indentures.html
6 https://www.colonial-settlers-md-va.us/getperson.php?personID=I34315&tree=Tree1
7 There was a Francis Gouldman baptised 14 Sep 1606 at St. Peter Mancroft, Norwich, Norfolk, England, born to Elizabeth Aldrich (Aldriche, Allred), age 22, and Richard aka Nicholas Goodwin / Gouldman, age 24.
8 Virginia Land Records [database on-line Ancestry] … Excerpted and reprinted from The Virginia Magazine of History and Biography, the William and Mary College Quarterly Historical Magazine and Tyler’s Quarterly Historical and Genealogical Magazine with notes by Genealogical Publishing Company, Baltimore, 1982.
9 ~~~ The Warriner Family of New England Origin, Being a History and Genealogy of William Warriner, Pioneer Settler of Springfield, Mass., and His Descendants Embracing Nine Generations from 1638 to 1898, by Edwin Warriner · 1899, pp 245-246
10 ~~~ The Warriner Family of New England Origin, Being a History and Genealogy of William Warriner, Pioneer Settler of Springfield, Mass., and His Descendants Embracing Nine Generations from 1638 to 1898, by Edwin Warriner · 1899, pp 246
11 Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia. 1659/60–1693]. Richmond, Virginia: MCMXIV (1914) … https://archive.org/details/journalsofhouseo16591693virg/page/n13/mode/2up
12 Rappahannock County Records, 1683-86, page 156.
13, 14, 15 Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia, General Assembly, House of Burgesses; McIlwaine, H. R. (Henry Read), 1864-1934, ed; Kennedy, John Pendleton, 1871- , ed; Virginia State Library. Journals of the House of Burgesses of Virginia. 1659/60–1693]. Richmond, Virginia: MCMXIV (1914) … https://archive.org/details/journalsofhouseo16591693virg/page/n13/mode/2up 
16 Early Pierces in the Rappahannock Valley: an annotated chronology. http://www.piercevaubel.com/pierce/6francispierce.htm
17 Footnote needed  … Have collected ‘arrivals’ of other Keelings. One was a George Keeling who arrived in Maryland in 1635. That arrival would be just across the waterway, the Potomac River, from Old Rappahannock County, Virginia.
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