Augustus C. Golding, U.S. Army 1861-1864 documented the Civil War destruction of Virginia. His papers and life now archived at William and Mary

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Augustus C. Golding left a major trove of papers and documents to us, available today from Earl Gregg Swem Library, College of William and Mary.

Augustus C. Golding was born in Greenwich, Connecticut on 20 November 1833. He moved to New York and enlisted as a carpenter. Golding enlisted in the Union Army on 23 November 1861 at Fort Hamilton, New York, and served as a sergeant in Co. G., 1st Battalion, 12th U.S. Infanty, 1861-1864. He fought mostly in Virginia and Maryland, returning to Maryland three times between 1863-1864 to defend it. After two months hospitalization in Pennsylvania and a furlough in New York, Golding returns to Virginia in November 1864 to fight until his discharge on 22 November 1864 at Elmira, New York.

After the war Golding resided in Fordham, New York, until his move to Norwalk, Connecticut, on 5 March 1866. On 6 August 1886 Golding was appointed postmaster at Norwalk, Connecticut. He died on 8 April 1915.


Scope and Content Information

Papers, 1859-1934, but mainly 1862-1864, of Augustus C. Golding (Goldin, Golden). Includes letters, letterbook, diaries, documents, pension papers, printed materials, and photographs. All items relate to Golding’s service in the Union Army, 1861-1864, in Northern Virginia, on the Virginia peninsula, and in Maryland.

Golding’s letters to family and friends describe troop movements, battles, camp conditions, his health, a hospital, and the weather. Golding describes his participation in the following battles or their aftermath: Gaines Mill, Malvern Hill, Mechanicsville, 2nd Bull Run or Manassas, South Mountain, Antietam, Fredericksburg, and Chancellorsville. He occasionally presents his views on war, politics, and the destruction of Virginia’s cities and countryside, and gives financial and practical advice. Includes genealogical data on Golding’s immediate family.

He occasionally presents his views on war, politics, and the destruction of Virginia’s cities and countryside. He also gives financial and practical advice. The collection contains genealogical data on Golding’s immediate family.

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