South Carolina Goldens, Goldings, Gouldings et al, 1672-1840

Learning more about early South Carolina (1620-1820) is a very special, personal project for me as I try to unravel (or reveal) the families that are connected to my own, beginning with:

  • Origin of Thomas Golden who settled at Newberry in 1763
  • Origin of William and Nellie Golden (Goulden) who settled at Saluda, Edgefield, c1782

Below is a start at making some notes and tracking down Goldens, Goldings, Gouldings and any similar-sounding name, AKA G-Folks, that have early roots in South Carolina.

>>>> You are welcome to contribute to this information by writing to me at Norfolk1956@gmail.com. I appreciate learning anything about any G-Folks from South Carolina.

My key interest: The family of William and Nellie Golden of Edgefield County, SC (1770-1840); and anyone named Nathaniel Greene Golden (Goulden, etc.); and any Golden family association with the Morgan family of South Carolina (1750-1820).

Notes re online search of online South Carolina Archives: Completed primary search for ‘Gould’ all years. Completed primary search for ‘Golding’ through 1833. A primary search = they were the primary focus of the document. Will do a secondary search at some time, meaning that they may be mentioned in documents as witnesses, surveyors, etc., but the search results will indicate that someone else is the primary focus of the document.


IN SEARCH OF — I track all GFolks (Golden, Golding, Goulden/ing, etc.)

Below is an overview of GFolks that I have found in South Carolina history plus some historical context:

1670 – City of Charles Town (Charleston) founded,
and established as capital of Carolina — which consists of what is now both North and South Carolina and the lands westward to include Georgia and Tennessee.

1672 – Charles Town is reported to consist of 30 houses and some 200-300 settlers.

1672 – There are no G-Folks listed in records of Warrants for Lands in South Carolina: 1672-1711.

1679 Feb 14 — Jacob Goulden is directed to receive 100 acres of land in some area not already ‘laid out’. Below is the exact wording. Who was Jacob? Did he get the land? Are there any other breadcrumbs that lead back to Jacob? Source: Warrants for Lands in South Carolina 1680-1692, 1911 edition.

1680 – St Philips church (Church of England) established in Charles Town. Parish registy 1754-1810. My visit in 2014.

1690 – Charles Town is officially moved to current site on the peninsula. Population is estimated at 1,200, making it the fifth largest city in North America.

c1700, bef 1730 – Ninety Six (District) the town was established in the early 1700s. It derived its name from the mistaken belief that it was 96 miles to the nearest Cherokee settlement of Keowee. The National Park Service operates the Ninety Six National Historic Site on the site of the original settlement.

1706 – Rebecca Gibbes marries to FNU Golding at Berkeley County, SC. Daughter of Thomas (b24 APR 1642 Sandwich, Kent, England; d1689 SC) and Elizabeth Gibbes.

1710 Oct 27th – Thomas Golding had a Warrant for one Hundred Acres of Land in Granville County October 27th 1710. (1608052150)

1710 – County Structure in South Carolina — this is an overlay of counties in 1710 with counties as they exist today.

Map Goes Here

 

1711-1712 – John Gouldin — John Hales vs John Gouldin, Judgement Role; SC Archive; details not online; see Series: S136002 Box: 002D Item: 0024A.

1711 Aug 18 – Thomas Golding, Abstract of land grant for 100 acres in Berkley County.  SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213019, Volume: 0039, Page: 00190, Item: 003.

1713 Jun 5 – Thomas Golding, Plat of a plantation called ‘Red Bank‘ in Berkeley County on the southwest side of Edisto River, containing 100 acres, surveyed by Thomas Broughton. (B.4. P.92). SC Archives; info not online; see Series: L10005, Reel: 0002, Plat: 01410.

—– Am not exactly sure how Thomas Golding‘s 100 acres figures into Red Bank Plantation. See an excerpt below from the plantation’s history page.

—– About Red Bank Plantation: 1710 – Earliest known date of existence. Dr. Nathaniel Snow was issued a grant 400 acres by the Lord Proprietors. He soon added another 400 acres to double the size. Dr. Snow made bricks on the property (1, p. 221).  1728 – Dr. Snow died. His will stipulated his son was to sell the whole 800 acres (1, p. 221).

1714 – Thomas Goulding // James Rawlings vs Thomas Goulding, Judgement Roll, 1714. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S136002, Box: 004B, Item: 00226.

1715 – Thomas Goulding // Samuel Perrineau vs Thomas Goulding, Judgement Roll, 1715. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S136002, Box: 005B, Item: 00373.

1716 – Peter Goulding is listed as a petitioner but not a resident. I assume that this was some legal matter but no more information is known.

1717 – Peter Goulding is again listed as a petitioner but not a resident, as in 1716. I assume that this is chancery petition of some kind.

1717 John Beauchamp vs William Scott, Admor. of Thomas Golding, Judgment Roll. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S136002, Box: 010A, Item: 0126A.

1720 – South Carolina adopts parish system for civil recordkeeping.

1721 – South Carolina becomes a royal English colony. 

1725 – Peter Goulding is listed in a census of St. George Parish, Dorchester, SC. His household has one male (himself), one woman, two children and 11 slaves (4 males, 3 women, 4 children).

1728 – Peter Goulding of Dorchester, Berkeley Co., SC, sold to William Jenison of Worcester, MA, for 120 pounds all of his shares and land in Worcester, Middlesex, MA, which he had inherited from his father Peter Goulding of Sudbury, MA.

1729 – The Settling of South Carolina 1729 to 1775 – a very informative website with many illustrative maps which are most useful in understanding the colony’s development and history.

1730 – Peter Golding is listed on a Grand Jury list for Saint Bartholomews Parish, pre 1768 Colleton County. Colleton County was broken up in 1768; pre-1768 (1682-1768), Colleton County was everything south of the Stono River in present-day Charleston County presumably all the way to Florida. However, the actual parish church of Saint Bartholomews Parish is in what is today’s modern Colleton County.

Visit this website for this map source and many other South Carolina maps

1732 Jan 8 –  The South Carolina Gazette publishes its first edition. (Not yet reviewed for info – available via subscription for online searchable archive.).

1733 May 23 – Peter Goulding // Memorial for 3 tracts totaling 720 acres in Ashley Barony (2 pages). SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S111001, Volume: 0003, Page: 00288, Item: 001.

1742 – Charles Town’s (Charleston) population estimated to be 6,800. Names?

1748 Oct 3 – John Goldin married Elizabeth Robertson at St Phillips Parish church, Church of England (Anglican now Episcopal Church)  in Charles Town (Charleston).

1748 Oct 3 – John Goldin married Mary Robertson; this entry is undoubtedly related to the entry just prior where the name is Elizabeth instead of Mary. One explanation is that ‘Mary Elizabeth’ is a popular combination … and somehow the two different sources recorded her name differently. Source:  SOME “Early” SOUTH CAROLINA MARRIAGE RECORDS: 1641-1799

1750 – James Golding born in South Carolina. (Godfrey Memorial Library, comp.. American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) [database on-line]. Provo, UT, USA: Ancestry.com Operations Inc, 1999. Original data: Godfrey Memorial Library. American Genealogical-Biographical Index. Middletown, CT, USA: Godfrey Memorial Library.)

1750 Jan 3rd – Ann Golding, a child of unlisted age and unknown parentage, is buried at St. Philips Parish church in Charles Town (Charleston). 

1753 Fort Prince George built on Keowee River
at Cherokee’s request to protect them from Creek Indians.

1759-1760 – John Golding served in the Cherokee War under Col. John Chevillette whose men were mainly from Berkeley County. The S.C. Historical Commission has a complete muster and pay roll of the men in the Cherokee Expedition. Those serving should have received land grants. Source

1758-1761 – Peter Goulding passes and his Charleston District estate is inventoried.

1759 – Henry Golding served in the Cherokee War (1759-60) under Col. John Chevillette, whose men were mainly from Berkeley County. Henry is listed as a private in Captain Alexander Shaw’s Company of Col. Chevillette’s Battalion of South Carolina Militia. Henry Golden recieved a land grant in South Carolina for 150 acres in Granville County on Horse Creek in 1767. // Sources: South Carolina Colonial Soldiers & Patriots, by Leonardo Andrea, Publ. 1952. Transcribed by Sara Augerson and Rootsweb.

1759 – Robert Reid vs John Golding, Judgment Roll. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S136002, Box: 048A, Item: 0080A.

1760 – Palmer Golding (Goulding) of St George, Dorchester is listed on the Petit Jury list.  // Jury Lists, 1757, Acts #863 [at SC Archives]; Page Number: 5; Family Number: 313. // There was a Palmer Goulding family that lived at Midway, Liberty, Georgia (SW of Savannah). Spouse: Mary and numerous children.

1761-62 – John Golding and wife to George Evans, Lease and Release for 471 acres of land. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S372001 Volume: 02X0 Page: 00623.

1763 – Thomas Golden receives land grant for 200 acres in Newberry, SC.  Survey Cert. January 31, 1763.

1763 Jan 31 – Thomas Golden, Plat for 200 acres on Matthews Branch. SC Archives;  see Series: S213184 Volume: 0010 Page: 00053 Item: 02. Mentioned within the document: Egerton Leigh, Isacc Perry, Berkeley County, Bush Creek, Matthews Creek and Saluda River. See entry for 1768 Feb 23.

 

1765 Oct 16 – Henry Golding listed along with Isaac Perry, John Troup and James Turner in a Plat for 150 acres on Horse Creek, Granville, County, Savannah River, done for James Turner. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213184 Volume: 0010 Page: 00025.

1766 – William Coats’  (Coates, Cotes) Bush River land adjoins that of James Hogs (Hoggs), Jacob Brooks, Mary Steedman and Samuel Kelly, John Furnas, Thomas Golden and James William. Source: Coats Family History – A Documented Resource for South Carolina by Charlotte Coats.

1767 Nov 24 – Henry Golding, land grant for 150 acres in Greenville County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213019 Volume: 0015 Page: 00143.

1768 Feb 23 – Thomas Golden, Land Grant for 200 acres in Berkley County. SC Archives;  see Series: S213019 Volume: 0016 Page: 00247. Mentioned within the document: William Coates, Jacob Brock, John Furnas, James Hoge, Samuel Kelly, Mary Stedham, James Williams, Bush River, Craven County. Document type: Memorial. There seems to be some disagreement among the documents as to what county this property was in. The original 1763 survey was for Berkley County and the 1768 Land Grant references Craven County. Regardless, the intersection of Matthews Creek with the Saluda River is just north of Pickens, South Carolina.

1768 Feb 15 – Henry Golding, Memorial for 150 acres on Horse Creek, Granville County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S111001 Volume: 0009 Page: 00434.

1770 – Samuel Golden (1770-1857 TN) born to Unknown. Census lists birthplace as SC; NFI. Married Elizabeth Caroline “Lydia” Parrish in 1809. Later moved and lived most of his life in Weakley County, TN. // Am in contact with his descendants (2015). There are numerous male Goldens from this line. YDNA testing was done in early 2016 and Samuel is one of our Golden. The exact relationship is unknown. Samuel may be an older brother, uncle or cousin to Nathaniel Greene Golden Sr. born c1783-1786.

1771 Aug 15 – William Golden, Plat for 250 acres in Berkley County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213184 Volume: 0016 Page: 00166. Mentioned within the document: John Bremar (Surveyor General), James Gaugin (owner of the land bounding to the east), William Golden, John Monk (owner of land bounding on the south of the plat) and Joseph Wright (Surveyor) … Little River aka Sandy Run Creek. See 1772 Apr 3 for the Land Grant.

1771 Nov 28 – Richard Golding, Plat for 250 acres in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213184 Volume: 0016 Page: 00129 Item: 02.

1772 – John Golding buys 128 acres. Where? Land transaction available via SC State Archive.

1772 Apr 3 – William Goulden gets land grant for 250 acres in Berkley County. The land grant of 250 acres is dated 3 April 1772, and a ‘memorial’ on the Little River is dated 15 June 1772. SC Archives. See 1771 Aug 15 for a map and more info.

1772 May 15 – Richard Golding, Land Grant for 250 acres in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213019 Volume: 0025 Page: 00437.

1772 Jul 1 – Richard Golding, Memorial for 250 acres on Saludy River in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S111001 Volume: 0011 Page: 00286 Item: 001.

1772 Nov 20 – John Golding — Daniel Mazcyk, Plat for 128 acres on Little River, Craven County, surveyed by John Caldwell for John Golding. SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S213190 Volume: 0002 Page: 00018.

1773 Jan 15 – William Golding, Plat for 300 acres in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213184 Volume: 0016 Page: 00130. See 1774 Aug 31.

1774 – Thomas Gouldin to Jane Milhouse, ‘Lease and Release’, 1774. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S372001, Volume: 04N0, Page: 00267.

1781 – A fire during the British occupation of Ninety-Six Town in 1781 destroyed most of the town, and its district records. Ninety-Six Town was the District seat for the area that would later become in 1785 (1608232035):

  • Abbeville County
  • Edgefield County
  • Laurens County
  • Newberry County
  • Spartanburg County
  • Union County

Much of what we could know about our early Golden family was probably lost in this fire.

1784 Jun 24 – Richard Golding, Plat for 640 acres on Twelve Mile River, Ninety Six District, surveyed by John Martin. SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S213190 Volume: 0005 Page: 00125.

1784 Jul 2 – Golding Tinsley (a cousin to Golding family of William Golding/Elizabeth Foster / RevWar hero), Plat for 640 acres on Twelve Mile River, Ninety Six District, surveyed by John Martin. SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S213190 Volume: 0009 Page: 00066.

1784 Jul 2 – Anthony Golding, Plat for 640 acres on Twelve Mile River, Ninety Six District, surveyed by John Martin. SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S213190 Volume: 0005 Page: 00124

1784 Nov 9 – Ann Golden marries John Baddeley at Charleston, SC (Pg 106, North and South Carolina Marriage Records, by William Montgomery Clemens, 1927).

1774 Aug 31 – William Golding, Land Grant for 300 acres in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213019 Volume: 0032 Page: 00588. See 1775 Feb 17.

1775 – William Golden born in South Carolina; died in 1860 at St Clair, Alabama. His parentage is unknown. He married Mary Ann Powell and they had a daughter: Martha Golden, born 1834 in South Carolina; died Dec  in Coal City, St Clair, Alabama. Martha married Lawson Ormintus Mashburn — married Sep 27, 1852 in Talledega, Alabama. There are many other named children per various family histories; but all of the family histories are in serious conflict. All info is in my Ancestry notes.

1775 Feb 17 – William Golding, Memorial for 300 acres on Long Lick Creek in Craven County. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S111001 Volume: 0013 Page: 00331 Item: 003.

1776 or thereafter — Anthony Golding — Account audited (File No. 2925of claims growing out of the American Revolution. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S108092 Reel: 0056 Frame: 00394 // The date given in the SC Archives Online is ‘c1776 or later’.

1776 or thereafter — John Golding — Account audited (File No. 2926 of claims growing out of the American Revolution. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S108092 Reel: 0056 Frame: 00419 // The date given in the SC Archives Online is ‘c1776 or later’.

1776 or thereafter — Reuben Golding — Account audited (File No. 2927 of claims growing out of the American Revolution. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S108092 Reel: 0056 Frame: 00427 // The date given in the SC Archives Online is ‘c1776 or later’.

1776 or thereafter — William Goulding — Account audited (File No. 3009) of claims growing out of the American Revolution. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S108092, Reel: 0058, Frame: 00268. // The date given in the SC Archives Online is ‘c1776 or later’.

1779 – Anthony Golding and William Gordon (William Golden?) listed as a resident of The Old 96th District. Source … Oddly enough, Gordon or Gorden is often misunderstood in place of Golden. My name is William Golden but my second grade report card shows William Gordon.

1780 – Thomas Golden (b.c1780) born; married unknown and may have still be living at Newberry, SC as of 1830 census. Had a son Thomas Golden Jr. (1806-aft 1880 De Soto, Louisiana) who married Eleanora Ellen “Elander” Batey (1812–1880). Supposedly his father was also named Thomas and was from SC; see 1763.

1780 – John Golden, b1780 South Carolina; residence 1850 Pike County, Alabama. Married to Gracie Snowden b1780 South Carolina d1860 Pike Alabama. Three sons: Samuel Golden, James Golden, Miles Golden.

1780 May 26th –  John Golden is KIA in South Carolina as a Continental soldier. As a Continental he may or may not have been a South Carolinian. His unnamed children are given an annuitancy due to his death from military service per the South Carolina archive document “House of Representatives / Annuities, Claims, and Pension Reports”’ — which offers no other specifics.

His date of death came just weeks after the three month ‘Siege of Charleston‘ ended on May 12, 1780 with the British taking the city and 5,266 American continental line and militia soldiers taken prisoner.

There are three John Goldens officially acknowledged as having served in the American Revolution — with only Virginia but not New Jersey or New York regiments having participated in the Siege of Charleston:

  • Capt. John Robert’s Company, Virginia appears to have held regimental status and is not listed as a company of any Virginia regiment. NARA records show it unit members as belonging to Capt. John Robert’s Company // John Golden held rank of Sergeant. What the NARA records do not show is any of his service except for his enlistment on July 1, 1779.
  • 2nd New Jersey Regiment // John Golden held rank of Private.
  • Captain Golden’s Company, New York Militia // John Golden held rank of Corporal.

1780 – John Golden, resident of East Side of the Wateree, Camden District, South Carolina.

1781 – Siege of Ninety Six – General Nathaniel Greene besieged the Star Fort which surrounded the town of Ninety Six from May 22 to June 18, 1781. Read your history carefully as the town’s official history notes that the “… British held out for 28 days in May through June, 1781 against a siege by General Nathaniel Greene and his American Continental Army.”  This was an American-vs-American battle. The defenders of Star Fort were a wholly American Loyalist military unit under the command of Lieutenant Colonel John Cruger, with just one British officer in the unit. A major British force of 2,000 troops did arrive to break the siege and then continued on to pursue General Greene’s troops as they retreated towards Charleston. This siege is described in the chapter Ninety-Six of the historic novel of Kenneth Roberts: Oliver Wiswell, 1940, as well as the 1855 novel The Forayers, by William Gilmore Simms. The American Loyalists survived the siege and moved to Rawdon, Nova Scotia, Canada.

1782 Jan 20 – John Gaulden (John Golden) of Camden District, Kershaw County will; typescript (MSS Will: Camden District Estate Record Book A1, Page 4; Estate Packet: Apt. 26, Pkg 926) (1 Frame). SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S108093 Reel: 0014 Frame: 00487.

—– Will witnessed by Samuel Tynes, John Brumfield and James Golden.

 

1783-1786 – Nathaniel Greene Golden or Goulden born at Pickens, South Carolina. >>> This is my line.

1784 Jun 24 – Richard Golding buys 640 acres. Where? Land transaction available via SC State Archive.

1784 Jul 2 – Andrew Golding buys 640 acres. Where? Land transaction available via SC State Archive.

1784 Nov 9 – Ann Golden marries John Baddeley at Charleston, reported in Nov 18, 1784 edition of the South Carolina Gazette.

1785 Hopewell Treaty – the Cherokee forfeited most of their SC land.

1786 until before 1800 (no date on the petition) — R.G. Golding — Inhabitants of Abbeville District living in or near Ninety Six(th District) petition asking that an election box be set up at Ninety Six and recommending certain person as managers. (4 pages). NAMES INDEXED: Henry Beard, John W. Calhoun, Alfred Cheatham, Jefferson Floyd, James W Fooshe, James Gano, James Gillam, R.G. Golding, Daniel Holder, Thomas F. Jones, A. G. McMullian, W. B. Meriwether, Thomas Nichols, Jonathan Norrell, Thomas L. Rotten, William W. Rotten, John Tarrant, Albinus R. Todd, William A. William and Simeon Wiseman.  SC Archives; info not online; see  Series: S165015, Year: ND00, Item: 05331.

—– In 1768 South Carolina replaced all of her previous counties with seven court districts including the newly organized area of Ninety-Six District. In 1800 South Carolina abolished all her overarching districts including Ninety-Six District. Source

1786 Jul 25 – Ruben Goulden (Reuben Golding?), Plat for 200 acres on branch of Twenty-Three Mile Creek, Ninety Six District, surveyed by John Hunter. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213190, Volume: 0022, Page: 00241, Item: 002.

1787 – Richard Golding (c1787-bef 1834) marries Sarah Niswanger (1794-1870) in 1810 at Abbeville, South Carolina, USA. Son: John Niswanger Golding (1815-1877). Parents of Richard Golding are unknown.

1788 Jun 10 – Richard Golding buys 384 acres (Richard died in Oct 1788). Land transaction available via SC State Archive.

1790 – James Golding resided at Claremont, South Carolina per 1790 census. Claremont disappeared as its own county in 1785 and became part of Camden District. My guesstimate is that there is a town of Claremont in Camden … or was. Other James Goldings over the next 50 years.

1795 Oct 16 – Andrew Golding buys 151 acres. Where? Land transaction available via SC State Archive.

1800 – Thomas Goulden and William Gouldin listed in 1800 census living at Edgefield.

1800 – Anthony Golding of Laurens District, Will Typescript (MSS Will: Estate Record Book A-1, page 282; Estate Packet: BDL 28, Pkg 8) (3 frames). SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S108093 Reel: 0016 Frame: 00167. READ Anthony Golding Will transcript.

1810 Census – Edgefield, SC – three Goldin (74, 88, 91) and one Golding (73) families are listed on the page numbers listed.

1818 May – Who was this Palmer Goulding in South Carolina? There is a well known line of Palmer Gouldings from Middlesex and Worcester, Massachusetts going back to 1710 … and originating in Wiltshire, England with Palmer Goulding, born 1605. Was this a visiting Palmer (Charleston was a major port city) or was this a resident Palmer Goulding?

1819 Aug 27 – William Golden of New York dies at Charleston, SC. He was born about 1796; age at time of death 23. // Reported in the Saturday, September 4, 1819 Paper: Southern Evangelical Intelligencer (Charleston, SC)   Volume: I   Issue: 24   Page: 191 … and

1821 – Green Golding appointed in 1821 as a Commissioner of Roads, Bridges and Ferries in the Parish of Saint Bartholomew, South Carolina. Hot List / Contact Bill Golden if you know anything about this individual: Norfolk1956@gmail.com. >>> This would be Nathaniel Greene Golden, born c1783-86 at Pickens, SC.

1822 – Green Golding et al petition (Nathanel Greene Golden) to be released from their commissioner roles on the Old Keowee Road project in the Pendleton District.

1826 May 25 – Robert Golding, Jr., of Newberry District, Will typescript (MSS Will: Estate Record Book I, pages 339-340) (1 Frame). SC Archives; transcript of will shown below. Also see Series: S108093 Reel: 0019 Frame: 00393. READ Robert Golding’s Will.

1828 Nov 24 – Anthony F. Golding – Plat for 426.75 acres on Mudlick Creek, Laurens District, surveyed by Marmaduke Coate. SC Archives;  see Series: S213192 Volume: 0048 Page: 00261.

1829 – Robert Golding Sr., records Will but does not appear to pass away until 1835. Robert Golding of Newberry District, Will typescript (MSS Will: Esate Record Book L, page 352) (3 frames). SC Archives;  see Series: S108093 Reel: 0019 Frame: 00561. Read Robert Golding’s Will.

1830 Aug 26 — Christina Goulden receives Bill of Sale for a slave named Robert from William C Oakley. SC Archives; info not online; see Series: S213003, Volume: 005K, Page: 00291.

Recommended ‘Pickens County’ research library for families in the Old Keowee Road area: The Faith Clayton Room in the Rickman Library at Southern Wesleyan University, Central, SC.

1825 Golden Creek Mill was originally built on the banks of Golden Creek
in 1825 by Joseph Woodal to provide cornmeal, grits and flour in
early American neighborhoods. In later years it was converted into
a Cotton Gin and Press.

1828 Pendleton District divided into Anderson and Pickens Districts.
Pickens District consisted of present-day Pickens and Oconee counties. 

More historical footnotes about Pickens County,
South Carolina through 2003.

1832 Aug 23 – Reuben Golding of Newberry District, Will typescript (MSS Will: Estate Record Book L, page 479) (2 frames). SC Archives;  see Series: S108093 Reel: 0019 Frame: 00597. Read Reuben Golding’s Will.

1835 — Golding – completed SC Archive search for documents dealing primarily with the surname Golding pre-1835. Reuben Golding has a will on file as of 1835.


South Carolina Archives Online Research as of 2015.12.28

“Gould” — completed review of archive.

“Golden” — start with 1782 and John Gaulden‘s will.

“Golding” — start with 1835 and begin with Reuben Golding and his will.

Review this collection of Archive snippets for land transactions in the Ninety Six, Abbeville and Newberry area. The Goldings were very close and neighbor to many of the families mentioned. My Goldens were a bit further north in the Pendleton and Pickens area. Their first names are often the same so this collection helps provide context.

Once all of these are done then go back and review searches for the above names but which show some other person as the search result. This means that the other person was the focus of the document and a GFolk was a witness, surveyor or legal contestant, etc.


Places to go/do research

South Carolina Historical Society – Charleston, SC

Edgefield Genealogic Society – Edgefield, SC


Source Material to track down and to review

  • Andrea, Leonardo. South Carolina Colonial Soldiers and Patriots. Columbia, S.C.: R. L. Bryan Co., 1952.
  • Draine, Tony, and John Skinner. South Carolina Soldiers and Indian Traders, 1725-1730. Columbia, S.C.: Congaree Publications, 1986.
  • Warren, Mary Bondurant. South Carolina Newspapers: The South Carolina Gazette, 1760. Danielsville, Ga.: Heritage Papers, 1988. Rosters of French and Indian War veterans appear on pp. 75-92.
  • Accounts Audited of Claims Growing out of the Revolution in South Carolina. Microfilm, 165 rolls.
  • Andrews, John L. South Carolina Revolutionary War Indents: A Schedule. Columbia, S.C.: SCMAR, 2001.
  • Annuitants Paid at Charleston 1828-1857; Annuitants Paid at Columbia, 1790-1857. Microfilm, 1 roll.
  • Bailey, J. D. Some Heroes of the American Revolution. Easley, S.C.: Southern Historical Press, 1976.
  • Bodie, William W. Marion’s Men: A List of Twenty-five Hundred. Charleston, S.C.: Heisser, 1938.
  • Draine, Tony, and Edd Bannister. Guide to South Carolina Pensions and Annuities, 1783-1869. Columbia, S.C.: Draban Publications, 1991.
  • —, and John Skinner. Revolutionary War Bounty Land Grants in South Carolina. Columbia, S.C.: Congaree Publications, 1986.
  • Ervin, Sara. South Carolinians in the Revolution. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1965.
  • Gilmer, Georgia, and Elmer Parker. American Revolution Roster of Fort Sullivan, 1776-1780. Moultrie, S.C.: Fort Sullivan Chapter, Daughters of the American Revolution, 1980.
  • Helsley, Alexia J. South Carolinians in the War for American Independence. Columbia, S.C.: South Carolina Dept. of Archives and History, 2000.
  • Lewis, James A. Neptune’s Militia: The Frigate South Carolina During the American Revolution. Kent, Ohio: Kent State University Press, 1999.
  • McCardy, Edward. The History of South Carolina in the Revolution, 1775-1780. New York: Russell and Russell, 1969.
  • Moss, Bobby B. The Patriots at the Cowpens. Greenville, S.C.: A Press, 1985.
  • —. The Patriots at King’s Mountain. Blacksburg, S.C.: Scotia-Hibernia Press, 1990.
  • —. Roster of South Carolina Patriots in the American Revolution. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1983.
  • Pierce, Alycon T. Selected Final Pension Payment Vouchers, 1818-1864. South Carolina: Charleston. Athens, Ga.: Iberian Publishing Co., 1996.
  • Revill, Janie. Copy of the Original Index Book Showing the Revolutionary Claims Filed in South Carolina Between August 20, 1783 and August 31, 1786. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1969.
  • Salley, Alexander S. Audited Accounts of Revolutionary Claims Against South Carolina. 3 vols. Columbia, S.C.: State Company, 1935-43.
  • —. Journal of the Commissioners of the Navy of South Carolina October 8, 1776-March 1, 1779, July 22, 1779-March 23, 1780. 2 vols. Columbia, S.C.: State Company, 1912-13.
  • —. South Carolina Provincial Troops Named in Papers of the First Council of Safety of the Revolutionary Party in South Carolina, June-November, 1775. Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1977.
  • Stub Entries to Indents Issued in Payment of Claims Against South Carolina, Growing out of the Revolution. 12 vols. Columbia, S.C.: State Company, 1919-57.

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